VIDEO: What Does Lockdown Mean for the World’s Poor?

What does lockdown mean for the world's poor? This documentary finds out - by asking them

Posted on 04/28/20
By Alex Broadbent, University of Johannesburg | Via The Conversation
People in need wait for their turn to collect free rations and groceries in Bangalore, India.
MANJUNATH KIRAN/AFP via Getty Images

 

Severe restrictions on travel and economic activity have been imposed in many parts of the world. For the poor, recessions have always meant starvation, lack of medical support for diseases including HIV treatment programs, and in particular the deaths of infants and children vulnerable to malnutrition and childhood disease. What do the restrictions mean for these people?

That’s the question a new 30 minute documentary seeks to answer – by asking the people who are most affected. The documentary is the result of a collaboration between the Institute for the Future of Knowledge at the University of Johannesburg, and the not for profit organisation Picturing Health. It features interviews with market traders, community workers, and ordinary people in Uganda, Malawi, Zambia, and India. Experts from international organisations like UNICEF are also interviewed.

The documentary offers a perspective that the world needs to see.

COVID on the Breadline.

Alex Broadbent, Director of the Institute for the Future of Knowledge and Professor of Philosophy, University of Johannesburg

This article is republished from The Conversation under a Creative Commons license. Read the original article.

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