US Military and Climate Security Budgets Compared

A new report connects U.S. military engagement and the threat of climate change, which now is being considered a threat to national security.

Posted on 09/18/14
By Miriam Pemberton | Via ips-dc.org
(Photo by U.S. Pacific Fleet, Creative Commons License)
(Photo by U.S. Pacific Fleet, Creative Commons License)
As the U.S. debates the President’s plan for new military engagement, thousands will converge on New York to urge the world‘s nations to take stronger action against the threat of climate change.  A new report connects these two issues, and finds that the gap between U.S. spending on traditional instruments of military force and on averting climate catastrophe has narrowed slightly.  Between 2008 and 2013, the proportion of security spending on climate change grew from 1% of military spending to 4%.combat vs climatThe report argues that a change from 1% to 4% of security spending is not commensurate with the role U.S. military strategy now assigns to climate change: as a major threat to U.S. security. Nor is it remotely sufficient to bring greenhouse gas emissions under control. The U.S. balance between military and climate security spending compares unfavorably to the record of its nearest “peer competitor,” China.

 

Although China’s environmental record is unquestionably problematic, it strikes a far better balance than the U.S. in the allocation of its spending on military force and on climate change.  Its climate security spending, at $162 billion, nearly equals its military spending, at $188.5 billion.

 

Other Key Findings:

  • The balance in the area of international assistance has not improved.  The U.S. actually increased its military aid to other countries from 2008-2013, relative to the help it gave them to reduce their greenhouse gas emissions.
  • For the price of four Littoral Combat Ships — currently there are 16 more in the budget than the Pentagon even wants — we could have double the Energy Department’s entire budget for renewable energy and energy efficiency.
  • The U.S. currently spends more on its military than the next seven countries combined. The disparity between U.S. military spending and the countries presumed to be threats to our security is even more extreme.

 

Download the full report.

 

Miriam Pemberton is a Research Fellow at the Institute for Policy Studies. She directs its Peace Economy Transitions Project which focuses on helping to build the foundations of a postwar economy at the federal, state and local levels.

This article first appeared in ips-dc.org. Click here to go to the original.

 

 

 

 

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