Tag Archives: Nile

Land Grabbing and Its Implications for Sudan – Views from a Scholar

The Nile basin is rich in natural tangible and intangible resources, which are witnessing massive processes of grabbing in the recent decades. Most of the land was allocated to companies from mainly Middle Eastern states – including Qatar, Egypt, Lebanon, Kuwait, Saudia Arabia, the UAE and Syria – acquiring huge areas of land to produce food crops, animal feed such as alfalfa, and biofuels.

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Sudan’s Sinking Oil Revenues and Middle Class

The prosperity of Sudan’s boom years ended when South Sudan seceded in 2011 and delivered a serious blow to its economy. The end of the oil years has reversed the great expansion of the middle class. Presidential and legislative elections are scheduled for 2015. Whether the hitherto quiescent Khartoum bourgeoisie will make apparent its dissatisfaction at its bowed circumstances is one of Sudan’s pressing political questions.

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Why Ethiopia and Egypt Aren’t Fighting a Water War

There were times last year, when the rhetoric in Cairo reached fever pitch, that some kind of conflict between Ethiopia and Egypt over the waters of the Nile seemed inevitable. It hasn’t come to that, and nor will it, if history is anything to go by.

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