Tag Archives: Japan

The Big Chill: Tensions in the Arctic

As the climate warms and the ice melts, the Arctic could become the next great theater of global cooperation—or a battlefield.

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Can Japan Overcome ‘Language Barrier’ for Foreign Workers?

Japan’s effort to attract foreign workers is facing the language barrier challenge. Japan accepts candidates for nurses and aged care workers from Indonesia, the Philippines and Vietnam. In 2014, 508 people arrived in Japan to work in these sectors and received Japanese language training before and after arriving in Japan.

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Nationalism, N. Power and Japans Fragile Media Opposition

Japan’s big media companies were criticized after the Fukushima incident for underreporting the risks associated with nuclear power. This triggered a surge in investigative journalism. The real issue underpinning Japan’s media wars seems to be whether news media that criticizes the government can publish freely in an increasingly nationalistic climate. The answer remains to be seen.

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Latin America Lures Asia’s Big Powers

Considered as the United States’ backyard for most of the twentieth century, Latin America today is a place where major powers seek to exercise a growing influence and find a steady supply of energy and natural resources as well as markets and investment outlets.

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Japan Faces Labor Crisis

Japan’s working-age population is shrinking rapidly and is causing increasing labor shortages. The labor shortage effect is compounded by its economic recovery which has led to increasing demand for production and labor. So, how does Japan solve this problem? Here are some ideas.

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Rule of Law Fading in South China Sea’s Murky Waters

The Law of the Sea is an unsatisfactory guide to referee quarrels that reside at the crossroads of disputed sovereignty claims and competing sovereign rights and jurisdiction claims. The rule of law in the contested semi-enclosed seas of Asia needs to be constructed on a foundation that is objective, fair and equitable, observes one analyst.

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Can Immigration Reform Really Save Japan?

Japanese population is set for an inexorable slide. Current forecasts predict a population of 86 million by 2060, with almost 40 per cent over the age of 65. Only immigration can save it. And a former director of the Tokyo Immigration Bureau proposes bringing in 10 million migrants over 50 years.

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The Ukrainian Crisis and Japan’s Dilemma

The timing of the Ukrainian crisis could not have been worse for Japan, as it presented Prime Minister Shinzo Abe with the tactical dilemma of whether or not to fall in line with the international community by imposing sanctions against Russia.   So far, Japan’s reaction has been lukewarm compared to the response of the United States and the European …

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Japan’s Constitutional Dilemma in a Changing Northeast Asia

Japan’s ‘defenseless on all sides’ security strategy has served it well through the post-war period, underwritten as it has been by America’s security guarantee and continuing presence on Japanese soil. Despite the steady accretion of its military capabilities, the ‘peace’ constitution allayed anxieties within Japan’s neighbors, China, South Korea and the newly independent Southeast Asian nations, about Japanese military intentions. Even …

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