Tag Archives: East China Sea

Asia’s Other Nuclear Standoff

With the world focused on the scary possibility of war on the Korean Peninsula, not many people paid much attention to a series of naval exercises this past July in the Malacca Strait, a 550-mile long passage between Sumatra and Malaysia through which pass over 50,000 ships a year.   With President Trump and North Korean leader Kim Jong Un …

Read More »

Subtext Important to the Australia–Japan Sub Deal

The Australian government’s efforts to pursue a submarine deal with Japan must be understood in the context of its view of Asia’s security order. The relationship with Japan is a bellwether of how the Australian government views the future of the Asia Pacific region, and particularly the challenges posed by China’s rise. The submarine negotiations have been a tangible way for Australia to strengthen its security ties with Japan as a hedge against potential threats emanating from a more powerful China.

Read More »

Rule of Law Fading in South China Sea’s Murky Waters

The Law of the Sea is an unsatisfactory guide to referee quarrels that reside at the crossroads of disputed sovereignty claims and competing sovereign rights and jurisdiction claims. The rule of law in the contested semi-enclosed seas of Asia needs to be constructed on a foundation that is objective, fair and equitable, observes one analyst.

Read More »

Japan’s Constitutional Dilemma in a Changing Northeast Asia

Japan’s ‘defenseless on all sides’ security strategy has served it well through the post-war period, underwritten as it has been by America’s security guarantee and continuing presence on Japanese soil. Despite the steady accretion of its military capabilities, the ‘peace’ constitution allayed anxieties within Japan’s neighbors, China, South Korea and the newly independent Southeast Asian nations, about Japanese military intentions. Even …

Read More »