Tag Archives: Afghanistan

Intervention, Evasion, Destabilization

If Libya, Syria and Iraq are coming undone and Ukraine has been gravely destabilized, it is the result of interventions by big powers that claim to be international law enforcers when, in reality, they are lawbreakers.

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Pakistan’s Foreign Policy Imperatives

Pakistan has been muddling along on a “passage to nowhere” because of the self-serving agendas of both its civil and military rulers alike. It needs a diplomatic space that must enhance its foreign policy options, the core elements of which should remain constructive engagement, non-interference and advancement of economic cooperation.

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US Commitment to Human Rights in Central Asia in Focus

As the U.S. has scaled down its presence in Central Asia, other countries are vying to fill the power vacuum. Russia is bent on safeguarding its influence on the region. As Moscow exerts more regional pressure, Central Asian governments are likely to heighten their crackdowns on civil society and fundamental human rights.

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Future Uncertain for Afghan Women

Women and girls may face an uncertain future in Afghanistan at the end of U.S. combat operations in December of this year, says a new report by Council on Foreign Relations. It makes several recommendations for preserving and extending the gains made by Afghan women and girls over the past decade.

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Why A Pak-Afghan Water-sharing Accord is Needed

By favoring a resource capture strategy Afghanistan may well have wasted a decade of potential development in the Kabul-Indus basin. But it may not be too late to engage in meaningful and constructive dialogue with Pakistan to make projects such as the 1,200 megawatt hydropower project on the Kunar River move forward, particularly considering the potential for benefit sharing, including flood control, sediment control and hydropower.

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Regional Distrust Fueling Water Conflicts in South Asia

Lack of a domestic vision for water in South Asia reinforces the zero-sum nature of international water disputes. India’s neighbors hold overwhelmingly negative views of New Delhi. But the election of the first single-party government for 30 years gives India an opportunity both for more coherent policy towards water and to explore opportunities for mutually-beneficial approaches to water with its smaller neighbors.

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Reclaiming Pakistan’s North Waziristan

The military operation in North Waziristan is only one dimension of the wider battle against militancy and violent extremism in Pakistan. The militant groups have strong networks across the South Asian country. For a long-term solution, Pakistan needs to develop a coherent and overarching counterterrorism strategy in order to strengthen the capacity of the civilian law-enforcement and intelligence agencies.

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Pakistan Under Siege

Pakistan successfully foiled a terrorist attack on the country's largest airport. But the ten attackers, all of whom were killed, did succeed in highlighting the country's failure in winning the intelligence war, which holds the key to rooting out terrorism from its soil.

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US Needs New Strategy to Combat Terrorism: Study

Since 2010, there has been a 58 percent increase in the number of jihadist groups, a doubling of jihadist fighters and a tripling of attacks by al Qa'ida affiliates. The most significant threat to the U.S., a new study concludes, comes from terrorist groups operating in Yemen, Syria, Afghanistan and Pakistan.

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Terrorism, Kashmir and Indo-Pakistan Relations

Indian and Pakistani diplomats reflect on suspicions touching paranoia, especially over questions such as terrorism, in New Delhi and Islamabad. Maleeha Lodhi warns Pakistan that goodwill alone cannot substitute strategy while Satyabrata Pal insists that lasting peace can only come by resolving outstanding disputes over Kashmir, Siachen and Sir Creek.

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