Podcast: Did India’s Exclusion Contributed to Afghan Peace Talks?

One of Pakistan's leading analysts attributes progress in US-Taliban peace to the exclusion of India from the process.

Posted on 05/3/19
By Luke Knittig (Host) | Via McCaine Institute


Ikram Sehgal is one of Pakistan’s most respected defense analysts. He is chairman of the Pathfinder Group, and heads the Karachi Electric, the South Asian country’s largest electricity utility company.

Sehgal sits with McCaine Institute’s Luke Knittig to share his thoughts on broad range of topics, including the Afghan peace process, hybrid war, and what has driven him to thrive and assist for decades in one of the world’s most complicated security environments. His company has had the contract to provide security to American installations in Pakistan for the past 31 years.

Sehgal calls US-Taliban peace talks “fairly successful”. He says one reason for progress in the peace talks is “because one particular country has been kept out of it. The only country interested in keeping Afghanistan aflame was India…

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