Obama’s Mixed Signals to India and Pakistan

The U.S. is starting 2015 with both a presidential trip to India and the approval of civilian aid for Pakistan.

Posted on 01/5/15
By Ankit Panda | Via The Diplomat
Fencing at India Pakistan border. Tensions have been rising between the two nuclear armed South Asian rivals in recent days. (Photo by Abhishek Baxi, Creative Commons License)
Fencing at India Pakistan border. Tensions have been rising between the two nuclear armed South Asian rivals in recent days. (Photo by Abhishek Baxi, Creative Commons License)

The United States’ diplomacy with India and Pakistan is off to an interesting start in 2015. In a move that is likely to raise eyebrows in India, U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry will visit Pakistan this month after certifying the Pakistani government has taken “action against” anti-India terror groups Laskhar-e-Taiba (LeT) and Jaish-e-Mohammad (JeM). The authorization will allow the United States to deliver civilian aid to Pakistan under the Kerry-Lugar bill (otherwise known as the Enhanced Partnership with Pakistan Act of 2009). Meanwhile, India is gearing up to receive U.S. President Barack Obama later this month as the chief guest for the country’s Republic Day celebrations. Obama’s visit to India comes after Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi’s successful whirlwind tour of the United States in September 2014 and is expected to bring the two countries closer together.

 

The coincidence of these two visits continues to highlight the ongoing confusion in U.S. policy toward India and Pakistan. In a similar unfortunate coincidence, the United States announced that Pakistan would receive 160 leftover mine-resistant ambush protected (MRAP) vehicles worth $198 million right before Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi’s scheduled U.S. visit.

 

While the United States and Pakistan face an increasingly difficult partnership, there is considerable bipartisan support in the United States for closer relations with India. India’s previous Congress-led coalition government had trouble creating sustainable rapprochement with the United States on strategic issues. With the exception of the 2006 civil nuclear cooperation deal and limited maritime cooperation, the U.S.-India bilateral relationship remained under-capitalized. The ascent of Narendra Modi and the BJP in India represents an opening for the United States.

 

Click here to read the complete article at The Diplomat.

Check Also

Abdullah Abdullah, the Harbinger of Peace in Afghanistan?

Abdullah Abdullah is more a ‘son of the soil’ than Ghani, who sooner or later will return to the US. It would also suit Afghanistan and the region if it had a rather independent government.

Why Bangladeshis Are Unhappy With the Visit of India’s Top Diplomat?

Many in Bangladesh are criticizing the recent unannounced visit of India's Foreign Secretary Harsh Vardhan Shringla to Dhaka. Bangladeshis think India is pressing Dhaka to drift away from China.

Leave a Reply