Immigration Relief Measures for Nepali Nationals

The USCIS has announced that the US-based immigrants from Nepal may be eligible for several immigration relief measures.

Posted on 05/5/15
By Staff | Via ViewsWeek
Candles at a vigil organized by a Nepali community organization in Jackson Heights, New York, in memory of the Nepal earthquake disaster victims. (Photo via Khasokhas, New York)
Candles at a vigil organized by a Nepali community organization in Jackson Heights, New York, in memory of the Nepal earthquake disaster victims. (Photo via Khasokhas, New York)

The USCIS has announced that there are several immigration relief measures that may be available to Nepali nationals who are affected by the magnitude 7.8 earthquake that struck Nepal on April 25, 2015, says an announcement posted on the USCIS’ website.
Measures that may be available to eligible Nepali nationals upon request include:
• Change or extension of nonimmigrant status for an individual currently in the United States, even if the request is filed after the authorized period of admission has expired;
• A grant of re-parole;
• Expedited processing of advance parole requests;
• Expedited adjudication and approval, where possible, of requests for off-campus employment authorization for F-1 students experiencing severe economic hardship;
• Expedited adjudication of employment authorization applications, where appropriate;
• Consideration for waivers of fees associated with USCIS benefit applications, based on an inability to pay; and
• Assistance replacing lost or damaged immigration or travel documents issued by USCIS, such as Permanent Resident Cards (green cards).

To learn how to request relief or more about how USCIS assists customers affected by unforeseen circumstances in their home country, visit uscis.gov/humanitarian/special-situations or call the National Customer Service Center at 1-800-375-5283 (TDD for the hearing impaired: 1-800-767-1833).

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