DHS Announces TPS Designation for Yemen

Secretary of Homeland Security Jeh Johnson announced the 18-month TPS for Yemen due to the ongoing armed conflict in that country.

Posted on 09/4/15
By Staff | Via ViewsWeek
(Photo by Nicola Romagna, Creative Commons License)
(Photo by Nicola Romagna, Creative Commons License)

Secretary of Homeland Security Jeh Johnson has announced his decision to designate Yemen for Temporary Protected Status (TPS) for 18 months due to the ongoing armed conflict within the country.

 

“Yemen is experiencing widespread conflict and a resulting severe humanitarian emergency, and requiring Yemeni nationals in the United States to return to Yemen would pose a serious threat to their personal safety,” said an announcement by the Department of Homeland Security on September 3. As a result of Yemen’s designation for TPS, eligible nationals of Yemen residing in the U.S. can apply for TPS with U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS). The Federal Register notice posted provides details and procedures for applying for TPS.

 

The Secretary of Homeland Security can designate a foreign country for TPS due to conditions in the country that temporarily prevent its nationals from returning safely, or in certain circumstances, where the country is unable to handle the return of its nationals adequately. USCIS may grant TPS to eligible nationals of certain countries (or parts of countries), who are already in the U.S. Eligible individuals without nationality who last resided in the designated country may also be granted TPS.

 

The TPS designation for Yemen is effective Sept. 3, 2015, and will be in effect through March 3, 2017. The designation means that, during the designated period, eligible nationals of Yemen (and people without nationality who last habitually resided in Yemen) who are approved for TPS will not be removed from the U.S. and may receive an Employment Authorization Document (EAD). The 180-day TPS registration period began on September 3 and runs through March 1, 2016.

 

To be eligible for TPS, applicants must demonstrate that they satisfy all eligibility criteria, including that they have been both “continuously physically present” and “continuously residing” in the United States since Sept. 3, 2015. “Applicants also undergo thorough security checks. Individuals with certain criminal records or who pose a threat to national security are not eligible for TPS. The eligibility requirements are fully described in the Federal Register notices and on the TPS Web page at www.uscis.gov/tps.

 

Applicants may request that USCIS waive any or all TPS-related fees based on inability to pay by filing Form I-912, Request for Fee Waiver, or by submitting a written request, said the announcement. Fee-waiver requests must be accompanied by supporting documentation. USCIS will reject any TPS application that does not include the required filing fee or a properly documented fee-waiver request. All USCIS forms are free. Applicants can download these forms from the USCIS website atwww.uscis.gov/forms or request them by calling USCIS toll-free at 1-800-870-3676.

 

Applicants seeking information about the status of their individual cases can check My Case Status Online or call the USCIS National Customer Service Center at 1-800-375-5283 (TTY 1-800-767-1833) at no cost.

 

 

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