South Asia

September, 2013

  • 28 September

    Bangladesh Cannot Survive Without the Sundarbans

    Sundarbans, the largest mangrove forest in the world, is a living and most effective natural fence protecting the coastal belt areas. It indeed saved us from the devastation of cyclones Sidr and Aila in the recent past. Not only so, it is the forest that offers various sources of livelihood to more than five hundred thousand local inhabitants. Unfortunately, the …

  • 28 September

    China Finds the Lost Kingdom

      One of the most isolated regions in Asia, Mustang lies in the north of Nepal, nestled between the Chinese border on the Tibetan plateau and the Nepalese provinces of Dolop and Manang on the other. For centuries, this land has been closely linked by language and culture to Tibet. Indeed, many believe that Tibetan culture, region and traditions are …

  • 27 September

    Enforcing Peace in Pakistan’s Largest City

      Having obtained consensus from all the political parties for a dialogue with those terrorists who are misusing religion as a platform, the Nawaz Sharif government in Pakistan turned its attention to the militant-infested crucially important city of Karachi. Law and order being a provincial subject, the federal government cannot deal directly with the problem without sending the provincial government …

  • 26 September

    Pakistan’s Dismal Education Prospects

      The Society for the Protection of the Rights of the Child recently published a report noting that Pakistan has the world’s second-largest number of children out of school, while in April 2012 UNICEF indicated that some 20 million Pakistani children, including an estimated 7.3 million of primary school age, are not in school. This phenomenon is one of the by-products …

  • 25 September

    Land Disputes Add to Afghanistan’s Security Woes

    Fifty years ago, Dost Mohammad’s grandfather had 1,000 sheep grazing on the family’s plot of land on the outskirts of Kunduz City, Afghanistan. The family’s livestock numbers have since decreased significantly, but then, so has the size of their land. “We keep getting pushed further and further back,” said Mohammad. “We’re also having problems bringing our sheep to Badakshan. We …

  • 25 September

    India’s Food Disaster Waiting to Happen

    UPA2 regime’s flagship program on the ‘right to food’ is slated to create more problems than it will solve, once it kicks off across the country. A creaky public distribution system and the weak economy will not be able to sustain the scheme In 2009, the UPA2 Government led by the Indian National Congress promised this country pro-people policies — …

  • 23 September

    Pakistani, Afghan Media Doubt Baradar’s Impact on Peace

    The release of former Taliban second-in-command Mullah Abdul Ghani Baradar by Pakistan may have heightened the expectations of peace in Islamabad and Kabul. But the news media in the two countries is showing more skepticism than optimism. Pakistan released the Mullah, in his 40s, on Saturday, September 21, on the eve of Prime Minister Nawaz Sharif’s visit to the United …

  • 22 September

    Bangladesh’s Secret Weapon Against Extremism

    Since the late 1990s, Bangladesh has witnessed an increase in militancy and violent extremism that has exposed women to greater threats than before. Such kinds of extremism prevent women from being emancipated economically and socially. In Bangladesh, a number of Islamist extremist groups believe women should not have a prominent role in society. Earlier this year, Hefazat (-e-Islam, a radical …

  • 22 September

    Pakistan: And Extremism Spread, Not That Silently!

      Film: Khamosh Pani (Silent Waters) Genre: Drama Written and directed by Sabiha Sumar This film is set in a Pakistani village, which is shown as a microcosm of the pangs of separation that Sikh families had to bear when India was divided in 1947 to create Pakistan as a separate Muslim country in South Asia. This is also the …

  • 22 September

    Pakistan’s Fight Against Taliban: Ambivalence Rules

    In a remote rugged mountainous region in Pakistan’s northwest, a bomb killed a senior army general on September 15 while he was returning from a visit to military posts on the frontier with Afghanistan. Two other soldiers were also killed in the bombing. Pakistani Taliban militants claimed responsibility for the attack. Days before the attack, Pakistan’s central government had announced a …