South Asia

September, 2014

  • 6 September

    South Asia Needs to Face up to Water and Energy Dilemma

    South Asia’s water and energy crises are deeply intertwined. Growing energy demand drives water shortages and lack of water fuels power outages. Regional cooperation – such as power trading between countries – could ease tightening resource constraints but such solutions have been largely scuppered by political suspicions.

  • 4 September

    Nepal’s Mystical Dolpa in the Mist

    Dolpa is one of the last two among Nepal’s 75 districts that doesn’t yet have a road connection and seeks to protect its pristine remoteness. Along with its rugged tree-less terrain, Dolpa’s jewel is Phoksundo Lake, a lapis lazuli-colored body of water, it is Nepal’s deepest and second-largest lake.

  • 3 September

    Why Do Indians Want to Study Abroad?

    Unable to cope with increasing demand for higher education, more and more students from India are heading to the West. New statistics show that offers of admission to Indian post-graduate students are up 25 per cent for 2013-14 from the previous year. But the bigger problem is that majority of these students are staying abroad after completing education, causing brain-drain — a bad news for India’s high-tech economy aspirations.

  • 3 September

    Reforming Pakistan’s Electoral System

    Fundamental reform of Pakistan's electoral process must reflect true democracy starting from the grassroots level. Whether Imran Khan and Tahirul Qadri get elected or not is of no consequence, history will record their contribution as catalysts for wholesale and meaningful change.

  • 3 September

    Pakistan’s Sharif on Course to be Undone Again

    The protests in Islamabad may have left Nawaz Sharif’s government in place for now, but they have also put his politically ruinous character flaws on display for all to see. Whatever forces are actually driving the expressions of popular outrage at his government, Sharif’s third attempt at running Pakistan is increasingly going the way of his first two.

  • 1 September

    Securing Pakistan’s Democracy?

    Though some say that the army is behind the current unrest, the generals do not seem intent on taking over a direct administrative role. But if the political protagonists cannot be brought to resolve their differences through processes that show respect for democratic process, the military is unlikely to watch from the sidelines.

  • 1 September

    A View from Bangladesh: Crossing the Line

    Some Bangladeshi analysts are criticizing Dhaka’s decision to let India transship essential goods to Indian state of Tripura, including food grains, via Bangladesh without duties under the river protocol between the two countries, but is getting nothing in return.

August, 2014

  • 29 August

    Fading Promise of the Indian Spring

    India's Aam Aadmi Party is still seen as a beacon of hope in Punjab’s bleak political landscape but the State unit exemplifies all that is wrong with it.

  • 24 August

    Modi’s Set the Bar for Talks With Pakistan Far Too High

    India’s Pakistan policy is confused. The fact that Narendra Modi government jumped to the wrong conclusion about talks with Pakistan suggests two things. Either it overestimated its capacity to enforce new conditions on a politically troubled, if not enfeebled, Pakistani prime minister or it simply hasn’t clearly thought through what signals it’s sending out.

  • 22 August

    Pakistan on the Edge

    Those who claim to defend democracy must understand that democracy is not just numbers — it is accountability, transparency, effectiveness and justice in governance, all of which are strikingly absent from Nawaz Sharif’s agenda. Pakistan thus remains on the edge.