India

March, 2014

  • 29 March

    Transitions of the Angry Middle Class

    A few years ago, the emerging markets and middle-income developing countries were considered to have a rosy future — the rising middle class was going to usher in an era of stability, democracy and mass consumer markets that would lead the world economy.   The global middle class is growing, but the hoped-for smooth democratic transitions have not occurred. Instead, …

  • 20 March

    Indian Elections: Rhetoric, Not Foreign Policy

    Holding forth on India’s foreign policy in the context of the country’s historical, commercial and cultural links with the rest of the world, the Bharatiya Janata Party’s prime ministerial candidate Narendra Modi, once related an experience that he had had in Russia. “I asked for some tea, a request that my hosts did not understand. But as soon as I …

  • 18 March

    Indian Polls: Congress Party Outlives its Use

    India’s Congress Party appears to have outlived its use as Mahatma Gandhi once said. It was formed largely to end the British colonialism and for swaraj or self-government. Established in 1885, it was the pivot of the Indian Independence Movement before it became the premier political party that has ruled India for more than five decades since Independence in 1947. …

  • 10 March

    A BJP-Muslim Entente Cordiale in India?

    In a TV interview last week, Bharatiya Janata Party (BJP) leader Arun Jaitley admitted that the BJP had a Muslim “problem.” “Yes, we have it,” he said, pointing out that there was a “problem both ways.”   “Part of the problem is that they (Muslims) have to understand us and part of the problem is we have to accept it…But …

  • 4 March

    Lessons India Draws From Afghan War

      Twenty-five years ago last month, Marshal Boris Vsevolodovich Gromov walked the last few meters over the bridge from Afghanistan to the Soviet Union, at the very tail of the army he had commanded. Mr. Gromov’s son, Maksim, had stood watching as the great convoy of tanks and armored personnel carriers thundered by, waiting for his father with a fistful …

  • 1 March

    When a Dynasty Read the Future

    Chandrika Bandaranaike Kumaratunga, the former President of Sri Lanka, has among her photographs a collector’s item taken when she was an 11-year-old girl. Crowded into the frame are no less than five South Asian Prime Ministers who served at different times over five decades in the 20th Century: her father S.W.R.D. Bandaranaike, mother Sirimavo Bandaranaike, herself (she was Prime Minister …

February, 2014

  • 28 February

    Nepalis Fear as India Dykes Mahakali River

    Last June, a flood in the Mahakali river – which marks a part of Nepal’s western border with India – swept away almost half of Khalanga Bazaar, a town that is the headquarters of Nepal’s Darchula district. The cause of the flood is still a debate. Most locals blame Indian officials, alleging that they opened the gates of the Dhauliganga dam upstream. This has been consistently …

  • 22 February

    India’s Maritime Gateway to the Pacific

    Being one of the most important seas of the world, geopolitically, economically and strategically, the South China Sea (SCS) attracts considerable attention in the strategic community in India. It continues to be seen as one of the most difficult regional conflicts in the Asia-Pacific and an “arena of escalating contention.” India has vital maritime interests in the SCS. Around 55 …

  • 21 February

    Cauldron of India-Pakistan Proxy Wars

      In an interview with The Guardian, Shahbaz Sharif, the chief minister of Pakistan’s Punjab province, seems to have hit the nail on the head when talking about the roadblocks to trade between India and Pakistan.   “Security agencies on both sides need to really understand that in today’s world, a security-led vision is obviously driven by economic security,” he said. …

  • 15 February

    Totalizing History, Silencing Dissent in India

    The agreement by Penguin Books India, a unit of Penguin Random House, to withdraw as well as destroy all existing copies of its 2009 book titled The Hindus: An Alternative History by Wendy Doniger, a professor of religion at the University of Chicago, within six months, is both disturbing as well as foreboding.   The lawsuit filed against Penguin India by Dina …