Middle East

July, 2014

  • 29 July

    Costs of an Unequal War

    What is new about the Israel-Gaza conflict is that Israel seems to be losing much popular support internationally. The paradox is stark and unavoidable — for every operation that Israel launches on Gaza and the Palestinian people, the Palestinian resistance becomes stronger and more determined.

  • 25 July

    How Many Nakbas?

    Without an understanding of what is taking place in Palestine, we cannot put an end to this horror. Today, the Gaza strip is one part of an apartheid system stretching from the Jordan River to the Mediterranean Sea, a de facto one state controlled by Israel, within which Jews and Palestinians are granted or denied different sets of rights and privileges.

  • 22 July

    How Will Gaza Conflict End?

    There are a number of ways in which the crisis could be ended, ranging from a short-term ceasefire to a more complete truce. The general consensus from analysts is that neither side was currently willing to make a long-term pact and the most likely outcome is a ceasing of violence without tackling the underlying causes of the conflict.

  • 20 July

    Beyond Gaza Bloodbath: Who Gets What?

    Even as the war against Gaza rages, Israel's radical nationalist government has its eyes set on completing its annexation of the West Bank, says one analyst. Israel now controls nearly all of Area C, comprising 61 percent of the West Bank, which it assumed control of as a result of the 1993 Declaration of Principles.

  • 17 July

    Pounding Gaza With Impunity

    With Gaza reduced to Hamas, 1.8 million people who live in Gaza are made responsible for Hamas. This is the doctrine of collective responsibility, illegal by international law.

  • 15 July

    Gaza Ceasefire Falters

    The Egyptian-brokered Gaza ceasefire did not last six hours after Israel announced resumption of its bombing campaign against Hamas which earlier refused to accept the truce.

  • 15 July

    Wars Without Winners

    Contrary to the view that extremism thrives when America is absent, empirical facts indicate that the opposite is truer. And each of the countries at the center of global concerns over extremism is in fact one that has seen direct or indirect western intervention, not western absence

  • 11 July

    Bombing Peace in Gaza

    The Israeli Army’s latest campaign in Gaza will not bring an end to the conflict. Both Israel and Hamas will have to strike at each other until they can separately claim victory. Past experience – and Israel’s “Iron Dome” missile defense system – suggest that more Palestinians than Israelis will be killed before that point is reached.

  • 6 July

    A New Normal for Iraqi Kurds?

    Taking advantage of the power vacuum left by the flight of the Iraqi security forces from Mosul and its environs, Kurdistan Regional Government (KRG) has sent its peshmerga fighters into large swathes of northern Iraq, most notably Kirkuk and its oilfields. These gains have given the KRG new forms of leverage with Baghdad in negotiating Kurdish nationalist demands. They also have triggered expectations of Kurdish statehood among the Kurdish population of Iraq, a long-sought goal that could be bankrolled by large-scale, independent Kurdish oil exports.

  • 3 July

    The Geopolitics of the Islamic State

    Both the West and the Gulf Arabs suggest that the terrorism that they dislike against themselves is acceptable to others. The history of their policies suggests that Western and Gulf Arab intervention leads inexorably to the creation of police states (as in Egypt) and terrorist emirates. Al-Baghdadi has announced that his vision is much greater than that of the Saudi King or the government in Tehran. He wants to command a religion, not just a region. Of such delusions are great societies and cultures destroyed.