April 24, 2017

Europe’s Fate Will Depend on the French Presidential Election

Centrist Emmanuel Macron and far-right Marine Le Pen will face off on May 7 in the second round of voting to determine who will be the next French president.

Next month’s run-off then is a critical juncture for the future of France and the EU. A Le Pen victory could signal the end of the project. The stakes could scarcely be higher. Read More »

Turkish Referendum: Democracy No More?

President Recep Tayyip Erdogan’s AKP, the Justice and Development Party, has been running the country since 2002. (Photo by unaoc, CC license)

Turkey’s April 16 referendum will be long remembered as a turning point in the country’s political history.   Turks were asked to grant additional executive powers to President Recep Tayyip Erdogan, bringing an end to the separation of powers. The 18 proposed constitutional amendments grant the Turkish president sweeping authority over the executive, legislative and judiciary branches, including power to ... Read More »

View from Riyadh: Suu Kyi on Ethnic Cleansing in Myanmar

Hashimiah Orphans Madrasah at Pasar borong Selayang, housing Rohingya Muslim girls. (Photo by Firdaus Latif, Wikimedia Commons)

It is high time for the international community to take stringent and decisive measures to halt the ethnic cleansing and crimes against humanity perpetrated against Rohingya Muslims. Read More »

Turkey’s Dangerous Referendum

Erdogan has not lost an election since 1994. (Photo by PASOK, CC license)

Turkey's leader will apparently stop at nothing to centralize power — and every move that backfires makes him even more desperate. Read More »

El Salvador Votes for Water over Gold

(Photo by Genia Yatsenko via Center for Policy Studies)

The people of El Salvador and their international allies against irresponsible mining are celebrating a historic victory. After a long battle against global mining companies that were determined to plunder the country’s natural resources for short-term profits, El Salvador’s Legislative Assembly has voted to ban all metal mining projects.   The new law is aimed at protecting the Central American ... Read More »

Is ASEAN a Newfound Voice for the Rohingya?

A meeting of Rohingya Muslim leaders and their supporters at a January panel. (Photo via Rohingya.org)

Myanmar has long valued ASEAN for the protection it provides not only from the wider international community but also its fellow members. But the unwillingness of Myanmar to resolve the Rohingya issue has pushed ASEAN members towards new forms of protest. This failure is already a tragedy, but for ASEAN it might become a disaster. Read More »

Saudi Arabia the Next stop on China’s Maritime Silk Road

Chinese President Xi Jinping and Saudi Arabian King Salman bin Abdulaziz ahead of their meeting in Beijing on March 17, 2017. (Photo via video stream)

The growing partnership between China and Saudi Arabia signals a consequential shift in the Middle East–Asia security architecture and will be an increasingly important space to watch. Read More »

New Libyan Militia’s Oil Strike Risks Wider Conflagration

A sign on the side of the road warns of the risks of unexploded ordnances. Sirte, Libya. (File photo European Commission DG ECHO, CC License)

Libyan factions are once again fighting for control of key oil installations in the Gulf of Sirte’s “oil crescent”. The latest offensive risks reducing Libya’s oil production and is undermining efforts to broker a peace deal. In this Q&A Claudia Gazzini, Senior Analyst for Libya, assesses the fallout. Read More »

Scotland Headed to a Second Independence Referendum

(Photo by Scottish Government, CC License)

The future is extremely uncertain, although once the Brexit negotiations between the UK government and the EU get properly underway there may be greater clarity as to what sort of impact that is having on opinion in Scotland, which is back in campaign mode and referendum. Read More »

Famines in the 21st Century? It’s Not for Lack of Food

A woman holding her young malnourished baby queues for food at the Badbado camp for Internally Displaced Persons (IPDs).   (UN Photo/Stuart Price, CC License)

Famines result from cumulative processes we can observe and predict. That means we can prevent them through timely public action. Read More »